Antique Blown Glass

Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740

Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740
Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740

Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740    Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740

Century French (Normandy) free-blown bi-colored double cruet & salt holder, circa 1740. Please register my store/page in your favorites, for a fine range of 14th to 19th century period metalwork, lighting & other pieces, all guaranteed, as to age, condition & origin.

Read all my terms of sale. Other pieces are for comparison.

Elly has a very large inventory of Fine Arts & Antiques at least 4,000 period pieces. 15,000+ French postal employees took leave of absence when the virus struck; rural post offices closed for 9 weeks. The virus hit less than 20 miles from my house; there are 700+ new "cluster" outbreaks since de-confinement.

I live alone , extremely isolated on the edge of a plateau, at 3,000 ft. Volatile thunderstorms mandate being unplugged; they destroy computers.

France was under martial law for 8 weeks; 100,000+ police & miltary deployed to enforce total confinement. Besides food deliveries left 8 feet from my house, I have NO human contact. This is not to elicit sympathy only understanding. Im 70, & need medical care, but visits to dentists, doctors & hospitals were prohibited, except for life-threatening problems. There has been little talk about it, but there have also been many suicides Ive been living in a war zone for 5 months. France is 18% smaller than Texas; the virus has decimated daily life 30,500+ people are dead the real number is believed to be more than 60,000. In searching for patient zero, a case was found from mid-November. UK deaths are 45,900 Elly works full-time+ in front-line Heath Care. French confinement eased, but my rural postal service is 3 days/week. The French Post website was crashing for 6 weeks.

Finally, on July 7th, the French website was fixed. The past 5 months have been beyond depressing I've never experienced such utter solitude. Be safe, & follow the science anything less can be fatal. With hope, Roy & Elly. The pre-eminent French glass expert Jacqueline Bellanger very specifically addresses the subject of free-blown glass cruet holders on pages 384 to 386.

Six are illustrated two (less-complicated, & without cruets or salt holders) are in the Museum of Decorative Arts of the Louvre ; only two other cruet holders (in regional museums in France) are more exotic than this superb piece. Neither in the Louvre is nearly as fine as this outstanding rarity, and on page 385, Bellanger observes that glass holders such as this were sometimes made to be accompanied by cruets in faïence or other types of ceramics, rather than glass. I initially assumed that the two smaller compartments were for holding cruet stoppers, but Bellanger clearly states that they were for salt which puts this masterpiece of free-blown and bi-colored glass into another category.

The massive folded and bi-color-topped (deep purple, in this case) rims are typical of Normandy glasshouse production of the first half of the 18. Century - circa 1740 is a conservative date - it could be earlier. Crizzling characterizes French glass from the La Margeride Royal Glassworks in the Puy-de-Dôme (Auvergne Region), and is a prescriptive indicator, as to the specific origin of mid-18. Century glass from the French royal glasshouse, when accompanied by a strong pinkish tint (see the cut & paneled tumbler to the left in photo # 2).

Crizzled La Margeride production was limited to 1760 to 1769 the factory re-opened later in the century, but with a different range of glass. Both the crizzling & color are undoubtedly derived from the use of volcanic basalt that is native to mountainous region of the Auvergne, less than an hour east of my house near Aubusson. Numerous pieces from La Margeride Royal Glassworks appear, but.

Ive only seen two free-blown glass cruet holders. From the La Margeride Royal Glassworks. Both cruet vessels of this extreme rarity are. Clearly pontiled, and the holder otherwise exhibits the striations, tooling, air bubbles and impurities that characterize early free-blown glass.

The waffled crimping on the thumb-pieces is well-defined, and is a feature also found on French whale oil lamps of the 18. The façon de Venise Venetian influence was the most important on French glass from the Renaissance until the end of the 18. Century, but the vertically ribbed handles on this piece can also be found on indigenous French pottery of the 18. Century and earlier as seen in photo # 3, the melon-ribbed oil storage jar from the Auvergne Region has the same type of handles (and is one of about 10 in my collection). The complicated nature of this cruet & salt holder might not be immediately evident, but it is composed of no less than 16 separate gathers of hot glass.

We are independently listed with. For France or the UK.

From the mid-1980's to 1992, I was one of a small group of dealers invited to exhibit at all 3 Early American Glass Club shows, & often shared a booth with my late friend, J. Anthony Stout, who was one of the foremost US scholars of English & Continental glass, and a Fellow of the Corning Museum. In the 1980s, I wrote a lengthy, 3-part review of the Catherine Thuro Collection of lighting; did research, appraisals, & wrote catalogs for US auctioneers; reviewed million dollar-plus Art Glass auctions for North American antiques journals, and became a founding trustee of the. New Bedford Museum of Glass. Please do look, & support. The New Bedford Museum of Glass. Is a privately funded, non-profit organization, and one of. Leading institutions in the world, for glass studies of all periods and origins. The constantly-expanding collections are mind-boggling, and the reference and research library is one of the most important in existence.

Its members include leading international scholars and collectors but it is lacking in major corporate sponsorship - and therefore operations and acquisitions funds. Any angels who can contribute to the viability of this internationally important museum would be highly welcomed.

Outstanding, but as-seen, and as described. What looks like a rim chip in photo # 11 is a long burst bubble. There are two visible heat checks (photos # 8 & 10): one to the cruet holder on one side, and the other in the center of one of the two the waffled connectors on the base. What looks like two other minor heat checks are imperfections within the glass. This has not seen a lot of use the prunts that make up the three feet are worn on the high spots, and there is some roughness to the tooling under the base. (3): maximum width across the handles 20.3 cm. (8): maximum width across the holders 17 cm. (6 & 3/4): rim diameters about 8.3 cm.

(3 & 1/4): salt diameters about 3.7 cm. Weight 800 grams, not including packaging.

Double-boxed & insured mailing within France is 14 Euros; to the UK &. Is 22 Euros , & to North America is 41 Euros. Please read listings carefully rates & conditions are substantially different. Due to illness, severe weather. This is strictly a small business, with no employees.

Buyers leaving less than 5-star feedback (now visible) will be permanently black-listed. There is a major problem with the age, condition or origin of a piece as described ; and this is confirmed by a qualified expert with professional credentials. I have absolutely no control over rates. And often absorb extra costs, such as double-boxing. Please inquire, as to mailing costs! Our independent certifications with the. Saving buyers 10% to 43% in relevant countries. UK checks, or bank drafts, & all bank transfers accepted.

My associate is an expatriate American historian of Decorative Arts, a published antiques editor & writer, guest curator, certified appraiser, & internationally respected authority in early glass, lighting, metalwork, sculpture, period furniture & other categories. He has placed pieces with French & US museums, including the Smithsonian, & assists me with acquisitions, research & texts. We are separate and private, academic collectors, looking to advance with our own collections.

Residing in the European Union. Josef is an extensively published expert with ongoing academic & commercial commissions, including 2 more forthcoming books.

We fiercely protect our Intellectual Property rights and in court, when necessary. The item "Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740" is in sale since Friday, October 5, 2018. This item is in the category "Antiques\Decorative Arts\Glass\Other Antique Glass". The seller is "etb2011" and is located in Limousin. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Primary Material: Free-blown & bi-colored glass
  • Style: French, early 18th century
  • Age: Pre-1800
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Type: Double cruet & salt holder
  • Color: Bi-colored
  • Country/Region of Origin: France - Normandy


Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740    Rare 18th century French free-blown bi-colored cruets & salt holder circa 1740